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of the tensions between religion, and the spot we picked on, dare i say, was israel and then to some extent egypt. and we wanted to go to israel in particular because there isn't such a diverse cultural environment in terms of religion, so that the tensions are, in some senses, watered down. as we all know, unless you've been meditating in a cave for the past 20 years, israel and the social environment in israel is very tense in terms of the relationship between the three great faiths that actually share something of a cultural tradition- judaism, christianity, and islam. and so what we- we have an extraordinary opportunity, and something like a great risk. i'm surprised david ainsworth, our executive producer, hasn't come out and read this e-mail message i sent to him about three days before we're ready to go on this journey. we planned it of course for several months. we're talking about a crew of at least six people- a lot of preparation, and of course, at the time when we were set to go was one of the worst possible times in terms of the tension; you know, again, another flare-up between the
with secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister standing side by side. secretary clinton calling the agreement a step in the right direction. >> united states welcomes the agreement today for a cease-fire in gaza. the rocket attacks must end. a broader, calmer return. the people of the region deserve the chance to live free from fear and violence and today's agreement is a step in the right direction that we should build on. >> today's announcement follows secretary clinton's diplomatic barnstorm through the middle east and made stops in egypt, west bank and egypt. and it follows more than a week of cross border rocket fire exchanges between israel and hamas in gaza. now, that has left 100 people dead. joining me now from gaza is nbc news foreign correspondent amman mulhadeen. i saw you turn around and notice the night skylight up behind you. that was a minute within the cease-fire taking effect. do we know that's rocket fire coming in behind you? >> reporter: it was, in fact. it was an israeli air strike north of where we are. gaza is still very much a war zone atmospher
and it's the ultimate nn trying to declare the judiciary in egypt basically null and void. >> yeah, look, morsi came out last week looking rather good, like a statesman and he helped organization the cease-fire and reined hamas in and took responsibility and moved immediately from that to give himself dictatorial powers. if those dictatorial powers are taken by him the arab spring is pretty much over and democratization is pretty much over. i'men couraged to see how many people come into the streets and they don't want to trade mubarak to the theocracy that morsi and the brotherhood are proposing. i'm not sure at that morsi is going to give up that easily. >> alisyn: thank you for your insight. good to see you. up next it's a state in debt. why is illinois spending for cable for prisoners and on pig races. and a man gets through security with a woman's boarding pass? how was that done and is anything being done about it. ♪ ♪ ♪ hurry in this saturday and sunday for great deals. likehe lucid by lg, free. or the galaxy nexus by samsung, free. this weekend, get the best deals on the be
we should be thankful for when it comes to the political world. and egypt's muslim brotherhood. the cease-fire deal betweend evf israel and hamas. we have that coming up next. with wholesome noodles and bite sized chicken, nothing brings you together like chicken noodle soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >> more breaking news and developing stories on a brand-new hour on "happening now." >> a new holiday spending bonanza. americans are feeling more confident about our economy. will lead to the great of growth, and what could set us back? >> also, an arrest in a string of murders in new york city connected to one gunman. what we are learning about the man that police in new york city say was poised to strike again. and a large bird crashes through the cockpit plane of this airport. details of the scare in the air for the pilot and passengers. it's all "happening now." >> but first, the cease-fire truce may be fragile, but it appeals to be holding. i am heather childers in for jenna lee. >> and i am rick scott in for jon scott. with egypt's president mohammed mo
saw this massive push in this really indigenous push within egypt, tunisia, and other democratic governments. some of those movements have had potentially scary things. there are some islamic fundamentalist parties that we do not have great relationships with and they understand that can be confusing thing. what obama has tried to do and in his famous speech in cairo is that he wants to deal with these countries and talk to the electorate. now we have an entirely different landscape, but in egypt, libya, and tunisia. relationship with these countries, these are countries with democratic governments. some of them have chosen paths that are a little more moderate, some leaning a little bit more to the fundamentalist side, but they're still fundamentally democratic and that will be a big challenge for the obama administration. host: its next for egypt? -- what is next for egypt? ?uest: in terms of ta host: the obama administration. guest: they still need to establish some of the legitimate government there. after the incredibly uplifting movements in it to rear square, it has devolv
as the cia director. >>> in egypt today one man is dead after violent clashes with police. protesters are camping out in cairo's tahrir square. in a scene strikingly similar to what we saw in the revolution almost two years ago, the demonstrators are voicing their anger with president mohamed morsi after what some are calling an unprecedented power grab. cnn's reza sayah is joining us from cairo once again. reza, we're hearing about attacks against several muslim brotherhood offices in egypt. what do you know about that? >> reporter: according to the brotherhood spokesperson, two of their offices were attacked by anti-morsi protesters. the brotherhood says the protesters were carrying molotov cocktails, clubs and knives and destroyed and heavily damaged these offices. remember, muslim brotherhood had called for a one-million-man demonstration of their own today to rival the opposition's demonstrations. late last night they called it off to avoid violence. but in these two particular cities north of cairo, they didn't avoid violence. >> reza, we're also seeing and i want to show our vi
on this friday, november 23, 2012. we begin overseas. the cease-fire between hamas and israel has held. in egypt, president mohamed morsi showed his authority yesterday. a startling port grab, freeing himself from traditional oversight. president obama followed through on an annual tradition of calling 10 service members to personally thank them for their service. the washington times and the new york times reporting there are now more state capitols dominated by a single party that than at any time since 1952. the washington times question, is this the answer, secure for gridlock? we'll get your answers. send us a tweet or post your comments on facebook. also, you can e-mail us. we will begin with the front page of the washington times for our question for all new this morning, there headline -- do you think this could be a cure for gridlock? the new york times also has this headline this morning -- we want to hear from you this morning. let me give you the phone numbers again. how did you vote in the last election? did you vote with the intention of one-party rule in your state legislature? wh
. that's going to be a big challenge. host ks what's next for egypt? guest: in terms of? host: in terms of its leadership. egypt, the other nation that you mentioned. guest: i think the big push forward in egypt right now is to establish some of the legitimatecy of democratic governance there. it was a rocky transition, certainly. after the incredibly uplifting moments in the square. it's devolved into a long and protracted conflict between the military, the muzz lem brotherhood, some secular parties, and there still isn't a clear governmental structure there. for the egyptians, i think, internally, it is -- >> watch "washington journal" daily at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. we take you back live to the house as members return for two recorded votes. the bill h.r. 6156, to authorize the extension of nondiscriminatory treatment, normal trade relations treatment to products of the russian federation and require reports on the compliance of the russian federation with obligations as a member of the world trade organizations and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: referred to the h
behind palestinianian civilians. but the government in egypt, which was backed by the administration, has condemned israel, not hamas. the terrorist group hamas doesn't want peace with israel. it wants war. it kills israeli citizens and then hides behinds the skirts of palestinian women. israel has the moral right and duty to defend itself from the bar barrack hamas. the united states should be in total support of israel, our ally. the u.s. should be bold in its condemnation of hamas and the u.s. should be bold in this continuing war by terrorist, like hamas, on civilized nations and that's just the way it is. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from oregon rise? the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. blumenauer: thank you, madam speaker. perhaps one of the best parts of serving in congress is the access to our library, the library of congress, the dedicated staff at c.r.s., the magnificent reading room. the library of congress is a national treasure. and leading the library of congress is dr. james billington. he was a scholar and institutional leader be
proactive and extending aid to egypt before and after morsi was elected, and i think it's important to understand what sort of things egypt needed right away was an ability to sell government bonds and treasury bills were because it takes about 14% interest which is pretty high for a government come and immediate deaths things look terrible. they came in and said okay. we will buy your one month issue of bills. a good payment unless the government defaults on everything. but that has helped relieve some of the interest pressure and try to move egypt out of the debt trap than greece or italy or spain. the second thing they have done is like the development bank there's quite good development banks that help identify the investment projects, make sure they are built without corruption and that they become effective. i think it is $4.5 billion that were qatar and saudi arabia have and christine was out there in september and they were working on a long program, very low interest rate and there would be another four and a half million or so but then egypt has a fighting chance to get an
of the arab spring. what happened in egypt was that the traditional model of power, the pyramids, but inverted. the people at the top got up and it and the base had its say. the arab spring is ongoing. it is messy. it is dangerous. what i'm talking about is bigger than egypt or anyplace else. it is a massive shift. it is one of those moments in 100 years the real historians like those at georgetown will write about this phenomenon. the base of the pyramid is taking more control. institutions that have always governed our lives, and music, are being bypassed answers the tested. people are holding them to account, demanding that they be more open, more responsive, more effective, or else. here in the u.s. to have the tea party hammering big governments. you had occupy due to the jolly bankers of wall street. social movements are competing. we have to help the more of my mental and the day. we are 3.2 million people at last count. we are asking the world to pay attention to the least among us. there are many things we can do to help them. we will see things are happening in the developing world.
: we will leave it there. a couple of stories regarding the situation in egypt. the lead story in "the washington post" -- also regarding the same story in "the financial times" -- back to the phones with our discussion for remedies to speed up the voting process. cathy, you are on "the washington journal." del ahead. caller: we have a vote by mail here. it is wonderful. we do not have problems. i am a little bit surprised a many people in the eastern part of the united states think there is so much fraud. we really do not have that much of a problem here. we always have a paper ballot to recount. host: our next call comes from jane in philadelphia on the line for republicans. caller: the story a minority inspector at the polls. -- i am a minority inspector at the polls. i think the only way to fix the problem is with an id. i had a van pulled up and ask them to see if they were in the book. they were not. they handed me a voter registration card. it looked strange to me. it was stamped from the city of philadelphia. the address said south spruce street. i know it runs east to west. it
times) reports that some senators are threatening to end aid to egypt. mohammad morsy has broadened his powers less repair john mccain says that while the u.s. is thankful for his help facilitating the cease-fire between israel and the gaza strip, he criticized his decision, which has prompted days of violent street protests in egypt. another senator, max baucus, the chairman of the senate finance committee, says that he wants to preserve the estate tax break, which is important for farmers who want to pass down land to their children. he hopes to expand the production tax credit for wind energy. watch the senate live on c- span2. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. >> you listen to their member, who said the damage was unprecedented, that it may be the worst storm the city has ever faced, and that the tidal surge was 14. governor christie said the damage was unthinkable. we had fires, hurricane-force wind, massive flooding, deep snow. you look at that and the flooding into the subway systems, the shut-down of the stock exchanges, you get a sense of the massive scale
israel and hamas with the help of egypt she is closely monitoring reports from tel aviv and in constant contact with prime minister benjamin netanyahu's team. we have word this morning of a deadly attack in benghazi, libya. the chief of police has been assassinated overnight. three unidentified gunmen have targeted colonel outside of his home in a drive-by shooting. he was transported to a medical facility and reportedly died en route. he was appointed the head of security after the september 11th attack on our consulate there. bbc reports more than a dozen security officers have been killed in the eastern libyan city so far this year. we'll have more stephanie after the break. you're always welcome to join us in chat online. go to current.com/stephaniemiller. we'll see you after the break. now? you know the kind of guys who do like reverse mortgage commercials? those types are coming on to me all of the time now. >> she gets the comedians laughing... >> that's hilarious! >> ...and the thinkers, thinking. >> okay,
on the ground in places like libya and egypt. you think this will reflect well on the u.s., or look like we are entering conflict for our own and game? guest: i don't think we choose to enter conflicts. we stuck with mubarak for while. we went with the protests as soon as they began on the streets. president obama trying not to become embroiled in to torsions abroad where he does not have to, but when things get too -- in situations abroad where he does not have to, but when things get to bad, he will. host: a comment on twitter. talking about ben ghazi and libya. what do those debts to reveal about president obama's foreign policy leadership? guest: that is a tough situation. i have been more following the campaign than the twists and turns of what happened in libya. it has not gotten a lot of coverage in some of the media. fox news have been pounding on it hard. i think maybe we will get some cooler answers after the election. host: jacksonville, fla., independent caller, patricia. caller: i am so sorry. i have three points i want to make and i were you to be patient with me. the first is
their laptops, and they simply type into the search engine the word egypt, and they got a totally different responses. why? because there is a process going on. every time we search for something on our laptop, we are not only gathering information. we are giving information about what we buy, about what we like, about what our political bias sees maybe -- biases may be, and you and i ought to get the same information if we tie in the same word. that is kind of scary. >> somebody is making up their mind about what we want. >> it is not somebody. it is a series of 0s and 1s. it is a computer algorithm. >> the algorithm is fine, and i understand it exists, and i will salute it. is there, but i want to know what that has to do with journalism. who gets up in the morning and covers some say -- something? who is going to cover a war? who is going to cover a campaign? without the journalists doing on is information gathering, all this stuff is below it. >> there are plenty of people who are going to do gathering, but the key word -- >> that is not true. there are fewer reporters covering the war
to me sierra -- tunisia, to yemen, to egypt. host: this is from maverick, who says republicans would prefer john kerry, freeing up space for scott brown. susan rice has degrees from stanford and oxford. patty, republican caller. caller: i wonder if this gentleman is aware that cnn had no problem going into this embassy to find documents. it was deliberate that did not send in the fbi to investigate. this was right before an election, and this gentleman is not sure why it took so long? also, c-span should have done some in depth shows before the election. i am disappointed in how you protected president obama in comparison to the-shows when president bush was president. part of the problem in ameritech is -- in america is the media should put under their caption white house stenographer. there was also a laser with where the attacks were, and that is why he got killed. he was an absolute hero. guest: there is concern with talking points in the mainstream media, as it is called, but in my defense i have written very critical things about barack obama and his presidency over the last th
your mother would be gone for years. she came to the u.s. in egypt even know it. >> guest: she's still like that in a way, you know, where she does things that we don't fit into the equation sometimes. and it's been a struggle to get her to be a little more motherly. i think at this point we've come to expect that's the way she is and we just take her as she is. i think it helps because we're not disappointed. i do hope we could be a better grandmother. i know my great-grandmother, my mother said she wasn't such a great mother. but to ask him if she was the most wonderful grandmother in the world. so i'm hoping that's the way my children feel for her as well. that's all i want for my kids have a good relationship. >> host: reyna grandecan assume other mother to read this book, or does she know within a? >> guest: she hasn't read the book is it's in english and my mother does not speak english. she knows some of us in it because i told her this is the story about my childhood and growing up in the u.s. and i write about you, my dad, but i don't think my mother really understand about ho
. tommy more about what you mean. caller: in recent conflicts such as those in egypt and libya we saw the president rather than simply propping up leaders the u.s. formally agreed with cover to go along with the protest movement on the ground. the you think this help the u.s. image or the best to look on this as for their entry complex for our own game? the way i saw things is we stuck with mubarak for awhile. i think this is president obama trying not to become embroiled in situations abroad where he debts that have to, but when things get to a point where you have to insert -- assert himself, he will. host: right wing on twitter as if obama has apologized for leaving our ambassador and guards to die? what has the incident there, the death of those american citizens revealed about president obama's foreign-policy leadership? guest: that is a really tough situation. i have been worth all we the campaign than the twists and turns of what has been happening. that has not gotten a lot of coverage in some of the media. fox news has been pounding on that hard. i think what we're seeing --
, and they simply typed into the search engine the word egypt. and they got totally different responses. why? because there is that process going on, every time that we search for something on our laptop, we are not only gather information, we are getting information. we're getting information about what we buy, about what we find interesting, about what we like, about perhaps what our political biases may be, so that in theory a search engine that ought to be giving me objective information, and you and i ought to get the same information if we type in the same word, not so anymore. that's kind of scary. >> because somebody is making up his or her mind as to what it is that we want. >> it's not somebody. it is, it is a series of zeros and ones. it's a series of, it is the computer, what is the word i'm looking for? [laughter] algorithm, thank you. [laughter] it is the algorithm which is -- >> algorithm is defined, understand it exists, and i respected and i will salute it. it so there. but i want to know what all of that has to do with journalism? who gets up in the morning and covers somet
the numbers of the top three diversity visas were as follows. 2009, ethiopia, 3,829. nigeria, 3,720. and egypt, a country i visited many, many times, 3,336. no question at all. they are all on the continent of africa. but as recently as 1994, earlier on in this long-standing 30-year setaside, it went more like this, poland, 17,000,396. ireland, 15,659. the united kingdom, great britain, 3,174. mr. speaker, one of the problems with the diversity visa is in fact it's a question of whether you put in all the names in the phone book or not. it's a question of who is gaming the system. it doesn't have any sort of, if you will, setaside to ensure an outcome. and within the outcome, whether you are taking from poland, ireland, united kingdom, or in 1999, the next year, few years later, it switched to bulgaria, nigeria, and albania. these top names that occur have a lot to do with how many people throw their name in a hat. and nothing to do with whether or not they really want to be americans. whether they really have the qualifications, whether they have any connection to america that would allow the
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21